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3 edition of morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives found in the catalog.

morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives

Irma Zintheo Rodenhouse

morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives

by Irma Zintheo Rodenhouse

  • 104 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by University of Washington Press in Seattle, Wash .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cushion star

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Irma Zintheo Rodenhouse and John E. Guberlet.
    SeriesUniversity of Washington publications in biology -- v. 12, no. 3. February, 1946
    ContributionsGuberlet, John Earl, 1887-1940.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[21]-48 p. incl. illus., 4 pl., tables.
    Number of Pages48
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15098008M
    LC Control Number46001491
    OCLC/WorldCa4707342

      Nance, James M., and Lee F. Braithwaite. “The Function of Mucous Secretions in the Cushion Star Pteraster Tesselatus Ives.” Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology (): Web. Richmond, Matt. A Field Guide to the Seashores of Eastern Africa and the Western Indian Ocean Islands. Dar Es Salaam: SIDA, WIOMSA, Print. Star Cushion Products, Inc. 5 Commerce Drive | Freeburg, IL Toll Free: Phone: Fax:

    The Morphology and Behavior of the Cushion Star Pteraster Tesselatus Ives. By Rodenhouse, Iram Z. + Guberlet, John E. SKU# Learn More. $ The Oyster, Parts XXVII to XXXVI, complete in one volume. By Mobius, Karl, Fraiche, Felix, et al. SKU# Learn More. Cushion Star (Pteraster tesselatus) Image ID: Comments: Another of the many colorful sea stars found in Puget Sound. In fact, northwest waters boasts the largest, fastest, and most varieties of sea stars found anywhere in the world. Cushion Stars are sometimes also called Slime Stars. When threatened, these stars are capable of.

      The Cushion star has also been observed to display selective predation; some of the Cushion star's favorite coral species are Pocillopora, Acropora, Porites, and Faviids. This behavior could alter the size and structure of the reef colonies by limiting the population of those select species, resulting in other coral species dominating the reef. Activities in Morphology The activities listed below are designed to assist the instructor in meeting the following learning objectives: 1. Increase knowledge of base words and derivational suffixes. 2. Increase reading comprehension abilities through the application of morphological analysis strategies.


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Morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives by Irma Zintheo Rodenhouse Download PDF EPUB FB2

The morphology and behavior of the cushion star, Pteraster tesselatus (Ives). University of Washington Publications in Biology University of Washington Publications in Biology General Notes and Observations: Locations, abundances, unusual behaviors.

The Morphology and Behavior of the Cushion Star Pteraster Tesselatus Ives. [Rodenhouse, Iram Z. + Guberlet, John E., Rodenhouse, Iram Z. + Guberlet, John E., Rodenhouse, Iram Z. + Guberlet, John E.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Morphology and Behavior of the Cushion Star Pteraster Tesselatus : John E.

Rodenhouse, Iram Z. + Guberlet. Get this from a library. The morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives. [Irma Zintheo Rodenhouse; John Earl Guberlet]. Ives, Synonyms; P.

gracilis H.L. Clark, ; P. hebes Verrill, ; Pteraster tesselatus, the slime star or cushion star, is a species of starfish in the family Pterasteridae found in the North Pacific Description.

The slime star's body has a wide central disc and five stumpy arms with upturned tips. Family: Pterasteridae.

The function of mucous secretions in the cushion star Pterasler tesselatus Ives. JM, Braithwaite. Respiratory water flow and production of mucus in the cushion star, Pteraster tesselatus Ives (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). Journal of Expenmental Marine Biology and Ecology The morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pleraster Cited by:   J.

exp. mur. Biol. Eeol., Vol. 50, pp. Elsevier/North-Holland Biomical Press RESPIRATORY WATER FLOW AND PRODUCTION OF MUCUS IN THE CUSHION STAR, PTERASTER TESSELATUS Ives (ECHINODERMATA: ASTEROIDEA) JAMES M. NANCE Department o/' Marinv Biology, Texas A&M University, Fort Crockett, Gaiveston, TX ) U.S.A.

and LEE F. In all previous studies involving the behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives, the possibility that this asteroid's copious secretions of mucus are defensive in nature has been suggested, but never studied to any degree.

Our research shows that discharge of mucus from Pteraster was triggered not only by physical stimulation, but also from contact with the asteroid. Rodenhouse studied the morphology and behavior in Pteraster tesselatus.

Smith studied the neural system and behavior of starfish. To explore this question, we weighed starfish arms and central disks to determine their center of gravity and symmetric mechanism.

The morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives. The oxygen uptake of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus was independent of ambient tension down to about 70 mm Hg and showed an average value of ml/kg/hr in normoxic water in the range 10–12° C.

The average uptake decreased approximately. and larvae of the sea star Pteraster tesselatus Ives, which spawns floating eggs ( to mm diameter) that develop into nonfeeding larvae and spend several weeks in the. James M. Nance, Lee F. Braithwaite, The function of mucous secretions in the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives, Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, /(79), 40, 3, (), ().

The oxygen uptake of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus was independent of ambient tension down to about 70 mm Hg and showed an average value of ml/kg/hr in normoxic water in the range   Rodenhouse studied the morphology and behavior in Pteraster tesselatus.

The morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives. University of Washington Publications in Biology. ; – [Google Scholar] Smith JE. Some observations on the nervous mechanisms underlying the behaviour of starfishes. (). The morphology and behavior of the cushion star, Pteraster tesselatus Ives.

The morphology, development and taxonomic status of Xyloplax Baker, Rowe and Clark, (). The oldest known crinoids and a new look at crinoid origins. Star’s newest cushion combines a layer of contoured foam internal to each air cell to provide a shell of stability, and a secondary layer of skin protection.

FIND OUT MORE. QUALITY. Star’s award-winning contoured cushion utilizes shaped cells to achieve a cushion that fits the anatomical form. Nance J.M. & Braithwaite L.F. The function of mucus secretions in the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology – O’Hara T.D.

& Stöhr S. Deep water Ophiuroidea (Echinodermata) of. Rodenhouse IZ, Guberlet JE () The morphology and behavior of the cushion star Pteraster tesselatus Ives. University of Washington Publications in Biology 21– View Article Google Scholar Some sources report a subspecies, Pteraster tesselatus arcuatus, but the validity of this subspecies is unclear and it may in fact be just a synonym for P.

tesselatus. Similar Species The wrinkled star (P. militaris) has wrinkled skin and longer arms than the slime star. only sea creature that uses slime to deter its predators. The slime star (Pteraster tesselatus), uses respiratory water flow and production of mucus to produce large quantities of slime when molested96, Water is pressed through mucus channels, rapidly forming a slime body, engulfing the sea star.

There is currently no rheological. The Morphology and Behavior of the Cushion Star Pteraster Tesselatus Ives. by Rodenhouse, Iram Z. + Guberlet, John E. Used; University of Washington Publications in Biology vol no. Covers the slime star or cushion star.

Add to cart Buy Now Item Price. What was Dr. Seuss’s first published book?. Morphology and Epithelial Ion Transport of the Alkaline Gland in the Atlantic Stingray (Dasyatis sabina) Swimming and Buoyancy in Ontogenetic Stages of the Cushion Star Pteraster tesselatus (Echinodermata: Asteroidea) and Their Implications for Distribution and Movement.

If you are generating a PDF of a journal article or book chapter.Pteraster tessalatus (Cushion Star) Illustration of Pteraster tessalatus (Cushion Star) Vector Image (15 KB) only available for download by registered users - Login or Register Now (Free & Quick!).The cushion star is a sea star that gets its common name from its inflated, pillow-like appearance.

This species lives on coral reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific, and its species name (Culcita novaeguineae) reflects its discovery and commonness in New Guinea. Juveniles look like typical sea stars, but as the cushion star grows, it becomes more inflated and the arms grow together, eventually.